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5 Best Practices When Creating Audience Targeting Rules

audience-targeting-rule

Using Audience Targeting rules can help you catapult your conversions and easily reach business goals on your website. However, there are a few things to keep in mind to ensure success and results. Here are 5 simple tips when creating successful rules.

1. Keep the message specific and short.
We humans are busy and love to skim! Although our rules don’t come with a character limit, we recommend keeping your message to 60 characters or less. This is equivalent to 3 lines of copy in an overlay, or 1 line in the bar. If you can’t get your point across in 3 lines, you might want to re-think your call to action.

2. Highlight only one call to action at a time.
Don’t ask users to do two things in one rule! For example, don’t ask visitors to check out your sale AND sign up for your email list. Instead, target different visitors based on where they are in the buying/consumer cycle. We’ve found that if you give new visitors a discount or offer the first time they come to your site and then ask for an email address on their return visit, they are 10x more likely to give you an email address.

3. Placement matters.
Be careful not to tempt your visitor away from an action-oriented page. For instance, if they’re trying to login to their account or complete a transaction, don’t show them a rule asking them to do something else. Also, keep in mind their level of engagement — be sure to ask people to share something with their friends *after* they’ve indicated interest (eg: scrolled down the page or spent a certain amount of time on your site).

4. Keep interest targeting simple
You can choose to create your rule using as many audience interests as you want. The creator works as an “and” not an “or” so each interest you choose will be interest “sports” AND interest “health”. This means that the individual has to show activity with both to now fill your interest pool. So keep in mind that the more criteria you choose, the smaller your pool of target visitors will be. To reach a broader audience with a specific interest choose 1 or 2 interest criteria at most. You can always create another rule that targets a different interest, but has the same message!

5. Test, test and test again.
Every target audience is different, and may respond to something you haven’t tried before. Using the same targeting rules (new visitors, interested in sports) test images, copy, and CTA’s. Depending on the number of daily visitors you receive, you should run your test until you feel like you’ve confirmed a winner – that means it could take a few days or weeks! Testing can produce tremendous results and who doesn’t want that?

So there you go. A few things to help you become a marketing ninja. Discovered something that could help others? Share what’s worked for you by leaving a comment, below!

Need to learn more about Audience Targeting rules? Then check out our post on “What EXACTLY is an Audience Targeting rule?”

  • Pingback: What EXACTLY is an Audience Targeting Rule? | AddThis Blog()

  • Ice

    So what can I say=) It is true=) so true

  • Kishan Bhatt

    To tell you the truth, I just read the subheadings. ;-D Ironic “Keep the message specific and short.”

  • Well, we certainly can’t blame you for that :) That’s why the subheadings are there, to help make it more scannable. But, if you do have the time or are looking for further details on creating audience targeting rules, this post has some helpful tidbits.

  • Well, we certainly can’t blame you for that :) That’s why the subheadings are there, to help make it more scannable. But, if you do have the time or are looking for further details on creating audience targeting rules, this post has some helpful tidbits.

  • Well, we certainly can’t blame you for that :) That’s why the subheadings are there, to help make it more scannable. But, if you do have the time or are looking for further details on creating audience targeting rules, this post has some helpful tidbits.

  • Kishan Bhatt

    Heheh you made me feel guilty, so now let me read it. :-D

  • Greg L.

    I LOVE AddThis, but I am desperately trying to find a way to put a stop to the full-screen popup that bothers my readers with the timely message “Like this article? Share it with friends!” (as pictured above on this page). I hate this, and want it off my website so badly that if I can’t make it stop, I may just keep searching for another sharing toolbar. I’m not trying to sell anything on my website, so I don’t need to pester people with annoying popups. I just want the toolbar to be there, and it is. That’s great. But people aren’t blind…they see it right there, floating along the side of the page. They know what it is, and what it’s for. Please please PLEASE tell me how I can make the huge popup quit appearing. =:(:::::::

  • Greg L.

    Never mind…I found the solution myself! Yippee! Now I really *do* love AddThis!

  • Shannon

    Hi Greg – Sorry for the confusion! Would actually love to talk to you regarding this since we are putting some more work into our dashboard and making things more clear. Could you reach out to me – shannon@addthis.com? Thanks!

  • Greg L.

    Hi Shannon — Thanks for your response. In my case, I strongly suspect the major problem is my utter lack of social media savvy rather than any possible design issues with any part of AddThis per se. As far as the effort to make the Dashboard clearer in some way for people like me is concerned, I am reminded of the old saying “Nothing is foolproof in the hands of a fool.”

    My interest in placing a social media sharing toolbar on my website came about simply because I saw others doing it and just thought it might be a neat thing to do. My problem is I don’t *use* social media. OK, I know what Facebook is. I don’t use it, but I know what it is. But “tweets” are sounds made by slightly agitated birds. “Analytics” is vaguely reminiscent of something I took in high school after algebra. “Targeting” is what you do to hit a bull’s-eye. And “conversions” are the results of repenting of sin and believing the gospel in faith.

    In other words, I am *clueless* in the world of social media and with the language of those who traffic in it. Of course, like many things on the Internet these days, the Dashboard is designed for people who have a handle on what these things are, what to call them, what to do with them, and why they matter. I had to feel my way around in the dark, clicking on things I didn’t understand until I stumbled upon something called “Targeting” and discovered that there is such a thing as “Managing” something called “Messages,” which can apparently be either “Active” or “Archived.” Eureka.

    You see, Shannon, my problem is that nothing in any of this shouts out “Hey, here’s where you can get rid of those annoying popups we planted in your toolbar,” which is what I was trying to find out. In my case, dogged persistence paid off (in other words, I just got lucky).

    Personally, my only suggestion might be the occasional sprinkle of plain English, a language in which I am quite fluent, rather than the constant stream of social-media-ese, which some may be shocked to learn is not the first language of many twentieth-century bipeds who walk among us.

    Not sure if any of this qualifies as “reaching out,” but it’s the best I can do.

    Greg

  • Dedi Abel Gnagbo

    la barre de ligne n est une e exception des licones representatif de reseaux en ligne je vous recommande la barre de ligne reseaux contrat../gda/ en lines social activez../gda/

  • I have addthis and I feel like I already follow these tips and still no sales yet. I have been waiting more then a month and I have not had one sale for my Minneapolis SEO business. I have had some leads but no sales. I don’t know what I am doing wrong. I have the best offer for the Minneapolis SEO type of firms and my website looks great. I am close to giving up and that is after more then a year spent trying to do this Minneapolis SEO business. I have cancer for nearly 10 years on and off and really need money this is really horrible issue.

  • My problem is I don’t *use* social media. OK, I know what Facebook is. I
    don’t use it, but I know what it is. But “tweets” are sounds made by
    slightly agitated birds.